Posts tagged: tea drinking

Study Finds Daily Consumption Of Tea May Protect The Elderly From Cognitive Decline

Study Finds Daily Consumption Of Tea May Protect The Elderly From Cognitive Decline
Study Finds Daily Consumption Of Tea May Protect The Elderly From Cognitive Decline. Graphic © herbshealthhappiness.com. Image – Pixabay (PD)

Tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. In 2016, Americans consumed more than 3.8 billion gallons [1] of tea, with black tea being a favorite. This is good news – due to the numerous possible health benefits of tea consumption, which have been well researched.

Recent data from a Singaporean human trial has reaffirmed the role of tea drinking in reducing the risk of cognitive decline in older persons.

Led by Feng Lei, an assistant professor at the National University of Singapore’s Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, the study focused on 957 Chinese seniors aged 55 years or older. Lei and his team discovered that the neuroprotective role of daily consumption of tea is not a bailiwick of one tea variety and is not limited to one race. They published the research outcomes [2] in The Journal of Nutrition, Health, & Aging.

The research team noted that drinking “real tea” – tea that is brewed from the leaves of Camellia sinensis, such as green, black (Earl Grey, English Breakfast, Assam, etc) or oolong, reduces a person’s risk of developing neurocognitive disorders later in life. The authors gathered information on the participants’ tea drinking habits, lifestyles, medical conditions, and physical and social activities. They attributed the neuroprotective effect of brewed tea to a combination of bioactive compounds which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that protect the brain from vascular damage and neurodegeneration.

The neuroprotective cognitive effects of tea have been widely explored by scientists: A study that first appeared in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [3] confirmed the association between regular tea consumption and lower risks of cognitive impairment and decline. A Japanese study [4] determined the link between consumption of green tea and reduced risk of dementia or mild cognitive impairment. A Chinese study [5] also presented evidence on the relationship between tea consumption and reduced cognitive impairment.

Cognitive disorders refer to mental health issues that affect learning, memory, perception, and problem-solving. The most common types of cognitive disorder include amnesia, dementia, and delirium. Data from the World Health Organization [6] estimate that around 47.5 million people are living with dementia which is a major neurocognitive disorder. This medical condition registers 7.7 million new cases every year. The main risk factors linked to dementia include advancing age and family history of dementia. By 2050, the number of people with dementia is expected to reach 135.5 million.

As of this writing, there are no medications [7] approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which likely leads to Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. However, there are coping strategies that may help delay or prevent the progression of MCI to dementia.

As posited by Lei’s team, drinking tea is a simple and inexpensive measure which may protect yourself from cognitive decline. Regular exercise [8] is another way to combat MCI since it benefits your blood vessels – including those that nourish your brain. Having a diet rich in flavonols and omega-3 fatty acids [9][10] could also reduce the risk of dementia.

References:

[1] Tea Association of the U.S.A. Inc. Tea Fact Sheet – 2016-2017 http://www.teausa.com/14655/tea-fact-sheet

[2] Feng L et al. 2016. Tea consumption reduces the incidence of neurocognitive disorders: Findings from the Singapore longitudinal aging study https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12603-016-0687-0

[3] Ng TP et al. 2008. Tea consumption and cognitive impairment and decline in older Chinese adults https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18614745

[4] Noguchi-Shinohara M et al. 2014. PLoS One. Consumption of Green Tea, but Not Black Tea or Coffee, Is Associated with Reduced Risk of Cognitive Decline http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0096013

[5] Shen W et al. 2015. PLoS One. Tea Consumption and Cognitive Impairment: A Cross-Sectional Study among Chinese Elderly https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4567322/

[6] World Health Organization. Dementia Fact Sheet http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs362/en/

[7] Alzheimer’s Association. Mild Cognitive Impairment http://www.alz.org/dementia/mild-cognitive-impairment-mci.asp

[8] Geda YE et al. 2010. Archives of Neurology. Physical Exercise and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2919839/

[9] P.J. Smith and J.A. Blumenthal. 2016. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758517/

[10] Colin R. Martin and Victor Preedy. Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780124078246

8 Health Benefits Of Tea

8 Health Benefits Of Tea
Infographic – herbs-info.com Tea fermentation pic – Wikipedia (PD)

Coffee is great for keeping you awake, but sometimes the caffeine is too much for some people. You might have noticed that many people who embark upon a healthy lifestyle usually start drinking more tea. Tea is amazing for your health! You get an energy boost, a warm and soothing beverage that tastes pretty great – and health benefits. Continue reading to find out the health benefits of different kinds of tea.

1. Contains Antioxidants

Whenever our cells use oxygen, they start to generate free radicals. These free radicals will result in cellular damage which can lead to several diseases and even premature aging. [1] We need antioxidants in our bodies to help prevent this cellular damage.

2. Immune System Booster

A study was able to show that tea can boost the body’s defenses against infection and possibly disease. Tea helps the immune system attack invading bacteria, fungi, and viruses. [2]

3. Weight Loss Aid

Green tea is believed to be an excellent weight loss aid. One study has shown that green tea has a small and non-significant weight loss effect in overweight adults. [3]

4. Lowers The Blood Concentration Of LDL Cholesterol

Research has indicated that consumption of certain teas such as black tea can help reduce total LDL cholesterol in some adults. [4]

5. May Soothe The Digestive System

Herbal tea such as chamomile and ginger can help soothe the digestive system. In particular, chamomile is good for people with irritable bowel syndrome while ginger can help calm nausea. [1]

6. May Reduce The Risk Of Breast And Prostate Cancer

There has been positive evidence for risk reduction of certain cancers such as prostate, breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers. However, the current evidence is weak and inconclusive. [5]

7. Less Caffeine Than Coffee

Herbal teas typically don’t have caffeine, while stronger teas like black tea have less than 50 percent of the caffeine in coffee. This allows you to freely consume tea without worrying too much about adverse effects on your nervous system. [1]

8. May Prevent Bone Loss

Recent animal studies have shown that green tea may actually prevent bone loss. [1]

The Top 8 Health Teas

1. White tea has a light and subtle flavor. Research has revealed that it has several health benefits and could aid in the reduction of colon cancer, the risk of arthritis, and wrinkles. [11][12][13] It only has about 1-2 percent of the amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee. Steep this tea in 175ºF water for 4 to 5 minutes.

2. Green tea has a clean, sweet, and earthy flavor. According to studies, it has been linked to the prevention of breast, lung, and stomach cancer. [14] Green tea has one of the highest levels of antioxidants in teas and may help protect your body from UV rays, improve cholesterol levels, control body weight, and help burn fat. [15][16] Steep this tea in 175ºF water for 2 to 3 minutes.

3. Oolong tea has a sweet and full-bodied flavor. Studies have shown that some of its health benefits include the chance for increased metabolism and reduction of body fat. [17][18] Steep this tea in 195ºF water for 3 minutes.

4. Black tea has a potent and sometimes bitter taste. It will reportedly help protect your skin from UV rays and could help lower blood pressure. [4][14] This tea contains more caffeine than any other type of tea but is only half the caffeine of a standard cup of coffee. Steep this tea in 195ºF to 205ºF water for 1 to 2 minutes.

5. Pu’erh tea has an earthy and smooth flavor. Research has indicated that it has many health benefits and can aid in controlling blood sugar levels. [15] Legend has it that pu’erh tea was given as a dowry by a Chinese princess sometime in 641 AD. Steep this tea in 212ºF degree water for 3 to 4 minutes.

6. Mate tea has a strong, grassy, and slightly bitter taste. According to researches, some of its health benefits include higher bone mineral density and satiety which can help promote weight loss. [16] Steep this tea in 208ºF degree water for 3 to 5 minutes.

7. Herbal teas come in various flavors ranging from rose, peppermint, jasmine, chamomile, and vanilla. It depends on the herbs and spices used to make the blend. Herbal teas have various health benefits depending on the tea. Chamomile is known to help with sleep and peppermint helps ease indigestion. Steep these teas in 208 degree water for 5 to 6 minutes. [17][18]

8. Rooibos tea has a licorice-like flavor with a sweet and slightly nutty taste. Studies have shown that it helps reduce stress, protects the heart, and is known for detoxifying and protecting the liver. [19] Steep this tea in 208ºF water for 5 to 6 minutes.

References:

[1] http://www.today.com/series/one-small-thing/top-10-health-benefits-drinking-tea-t81111

[2] http://www.cbsnews.com/news/study-tea-boosts-immune-system/

[3] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD008650.pub2/abstract;jsessionid=D090F08B87054FDFD38D9…/

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14519829

[5] http://www.maturitas.org/article/S0378-5122(12)00270-8/abstract

[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21995704

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21698507

[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12094635

[9] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19128856

[10] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16582024

[11] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11209110

[12] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11694607

[13] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13678386

[14] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038021

[15] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057679

[16] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22130241

[17] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26483209

[18] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18630390

[19] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20833235