The Benefits Of Coffee

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The Benefits Of Coffee
Graphic: © herbs-info.com. Image source – Pixabay (PD).

Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world – and it’s easy to see why. It excites our taste buds and gives us the much-needed energy boost to make it through the day. However, there’s more to that luscious mug than meets the eye (or tongue). Coffee (not necessarily the sugar or creamer, though) is in fact loaded with beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that do more than keep you alert…

7 Benefits of Coffee Backed by Science

1. Boost Metabolism: Most fat-burning supplements in the market contain caffeine – and for a good reason. The substance has been scientifically demonstrated to boost your metabolic rate and help with weight loss. [1]

2. Protect Liver: Liver cirrhosis is a serious condition in which healthy tissue in the liver is replaced by scar tissue. Different studies in 2001, 2002, and 2006 concluded that ingredients in coffee inhibit the onset of cirrhosis. [2][3][4]

3. Help with Type 2 Diabetes: According to one systematic review in the JAMA medical journal, “habitual coffee consumption is associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes.” [5] This hypothesis is supported by another large cohort review of 457,922 individuals in which a cup of coffee every day reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 7%. [6]

4. Mental Health: Did you know that some peer-reviewed studies claim that coffee reduces the risk of depression by 20% and suicide by 53% respectively? [7][8] Simply put, drink coffee moderately to improve your quality of life.

5. Heart Health: While caffeine increases your heart rate slightly (3-4mm/Hg), credible studies show that it doesn’t increase your risk of cardiovascular problems. [9] In a 2013 study of over 80,000 respondents, the researchers concluded that coffee consumption was “inversely associated with risk of CVD and stroke in general population.” [10]

6. Risk of Cancer: The World Health Organization notes that liver and colorectal cancer are the third and fourth leading causes of death due to cancer. [11] With this in mind, some studies show that ingredients in coffee lower the risk of liver cancer and colorectal cancer by 40% and 15% respectively. [12][13]

Related:  Top 10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Pistachios

7. Fiber Intake: A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, claims that coffee contains high amounts of dietary fiber that can help control sugar levels, cholesterol, improve bowel health. [14]

Please note that this content should never be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinicians.

References:

[1] Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and post-obese human volunteers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2912010.

[2] Coffee, caffeine, and the risk of liver cirrhosis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11557177.

[3] Does coffee protect against liver cirrhosis? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11897178.

[4] Coffee, cirrhosis, and transaminase enzymes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16772246.

[5] Coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15998896.

[6] Coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea consumption in relation to incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review with meta-analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20008687.

[7] Coffee, caffeine, and risk of depression among women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21949167.

[8] A prospective study of coffee drinking and suicide in women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8604958.

[9] Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in men and women: a prospective cohort study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16636169.

[10] The impact of green tea and coffee consumption on the reduced risk of stroke incidence in Japanese population: the Japan public health center-based study cohort. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23493733.

[11] Cancer https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cancer.

[12] Coffee Consumption and Risk of Liver Cancer: A Meta-Analysis https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0016508507005689.

[13] Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22695871.

[14] Dietary Fiber in Brewed Coffee https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jf062839p.


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